Our F.A.Q.
Read our answers to some frequently asked questions from our students, parents & educators

MySckool Frequently Asked Questions

Speech therapy can vary from a short duration for something like an isolated tongue thrust or reverse swallow to a lengthy period of time for people that are deaf or have Down syndrome, autism, or cerebral palsy. Each case needs to be looked at individually and discussed with the professionals and family members within the context of the remediation process.

Speech-Language Pathologists specialize in treating a variety of speech-language, cognitive, voice, and feeding-swallowing problems.

Working with the full range of human communication and its disorders, speech-language pathologists:

  • Evaluate and diagnose speech, language, cognitive-communication and swallowing disorders.
  • Treat speech, language, cognitive-communication and swallowing disorders in individuals of all ages, from infants to the elderly.

The main components of speech production include: phonation, the process of sound production; resonance; intonation, the variation of pitch; and voice, including aeromechanical components of respiration.

The main components of language include:

  • Phonology, the manipulation of sound according to the rules of the language
  • Morphology, the understanding and use of the minimal units of meaning
  • Syntax, the grammar rules for constructing sentences in language
  • Semantics, the interpretation of meaning from the signs or symbols of communication
  • Pragmatics, the social aspects of communication.

Speech and language disorders in children can affect the way they talk, understand, analyze or process information. Four major areas in which these impairments occur include:

  • Articulation | speech impairments where the child produces sounds incorrectly (e.g., lisp, difficulty articulating certain sounds, such as “l” or “r”);
  • Fluency | speech impairments where a child’s flow of speech is disrupted by sounds, syllables, and words that are repeated, prolonged, or avoided and where there may be silent blocks or inappropriate inhalation, exhalation, or phonation patterns;
  • Voice | speech impairments where the child’s voice has an abnormal quality to its pitch, resonance, or loudness; and
  • Language | language impairments where the child has problems expressing needs, ideas, or information, and/or in understanding what others say.

Language disorders include a child’s ability to hold meaningful conversations, understand others, problem solve, read and comprehend, and express thoughts through spoken or written words.

Our Speech-Language Pathologists work with children from infancy to adolescence. If you are concerned about your child’s communication skills, please call to find out if your child should be seen for a communication evaluation and/or consultation. The early months of your baby’s life are of great importance for good social skills, emotional growth, and intelligence!

Here are some of the common warning signs of a communication disorder by age range.

Birth to Six Months

  • Developmental or medical problems
  • Lack of response to sound
  • Lack of interest in speech
  • Limited eye contact
  • Feeding problems
  • Very limited vocalizations
  • Difficulties with attachment
  • Lack of interest in socializing

Six to Twelve Months

  • Limited sound production, lack of variety or amount.
  • Groping movements when attempting to make or imitate sounds.
  • Oral-motor problems such as excessive drooling, trouble with solid foods, intolerance to touch in and around the mouth.
  • Lack of interest in sounds-making toys, radios, T.V., music, voices.
  • Developmental or medical problems
  • Lack of response to sound
  • Lack of interest in speech
  • Limited eye contact
  • Feeding problems
  • Very limited vocalizations
  • Difficulties with attachment
  • Lack of interest in socializing

Twelve to Eighteen Months

  • Easily distractible.
  • Does not understand any words or directions.
  • Limited sound production, lack of variety or amount.
  • Groping movements when attempting to make or imitate sounds.
  • Oral-motor problems such as excessive drooling, trouble with solid foods, intolerance to touch in and around the mouth.
  • Lack of interest in sounds-making toys, radios, T.V., music, voices.

Eighteen to Twenty-four Months

  • Not using words some of the time to communicate.
  • No interest in imitation.
  • Won’t play games.
  • No jargon.
  • Grunting and pointing as primary means of communication.
  • Easily distractible.
  • Does not understand any words or directions.
  • Limited sound production, lack of variety or amount.
  • Groping movements when attempting to make or imitate sounds.
  • Oral-motor problems such as excessive drooling, trouble with solid foods, intolerance to touch in and around the mouth.
  • Lack of interest in sounds-making toys, radios, T.V., music, voices.

Two to Three Year Olds

  • Not combining words
  • Must be told and retold to carry out simple directions (not just non-compliance)
  • Using only nouns
  • Poor eye contact
  • No rapid increase in number of words understood and used
  • Does not tolerate sitting for listening activity/looking at books, etc.

Three to Four Year Olds

  • Not speaking in full sentences (not necessarily correct grammar, but nice variety of word types
  • Not using “I” to refer to self
  • Cannot relate experiences, even in simple telegraph sentences

M.A. is an abbreviation for master of arts. M.S. is an abbreviation for master of sciences. Both graduate degrees have been used for students of Communication Disorders depending on the university attended and the year.

C.C.C. is an abbreviation for Certificate of Clinical Competence. Speech pathologists that have passed a national exam and did a clinical fellowship year with proper accreditation from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association will have those letters after their name.

S.L.P is an abbreviation for Speech-Language Pathologist, a certification awarded by the Americah Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)

There is definitely the possibility that impairment in the speech and language areas can have a detrimental effect on academics and social interactions. It is also known to have a very negative impact on self-esteem. These are all factors that can be addressed with treatment

Health insurance may sometimes cover speech and language therapy. There are variations in coverage based on carriers, individual’s policy and diagnosis. Be aware of restrictions, deductibles and co-payments.

Other Education Programs for Kids

Speech Therapy

We help treat a wide range of communication disorders & conditions

FitKID MIND

We teach kids how to be confident and control their emotions

FitKID NUTRITION

We teach kids about planning and enjoying good nutritional habits

FitKID SOCIAL

We help kids become comfortable in their personal social circles

FitKID BODY

We teach kids how to strengthen & care for their bodies in a fun way

MySckool Reviews & Recommendations

Jane D.
San Jose
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Every time I've had any sort of issue with either of my kids, I've reached out to Annette. When our sons were very argumentative with each other, I asked her for ideas, and she gave them some sibling sessions that really changed how they approached each other. She can really do anything! I highly recommend her for any challenge your child may be facing. She will lead them to success!
Skidmore Family
...
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Since my 3 year old son has started working with Annette, we have seen great improvements in his vocabulary, general behavior, and desire to express himself. She has truly helped our family.
Nancy Cisler
Principal, Latimer School
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Annette's rapport with the neediest students is incredible. She displays compassion and understanding but always holds them accountable for their actions. Annette is a perfect combination of compassion, skill and directness, and she will be an asset to your organization.
John Anderson
...
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Annette Waters started working with our daughter a few years ago to help our daughter with her social skills. Ms. Waters first worked with our daughter in a school environment, and then later as an independent therapist. Our daughter's social skills have improved under Ms. Waters' care. Ms. Waters speaks with us before and after our daughter's sessions and she is quick to identify areas to work on. She also gives us activities that we can do at home to help our daughter improve her social skills. Ms. Waters works with our daughter both in a clinical setting and in the community, or "real world" setting. The latter is especially useful for our daughter to work on real-life social skills.
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